Curricula Peer Reviewed

Future Leaders Outreach Network (FLON)

Curriculum Program Manuscript Peer-Reviewed by American Journal Health Studies (AJHS) Published, 2011

Clemons, Wetta-Hall, Jacobson, Chesser & Moss

DOES ONE SIZE FIT ALL: CULTURALLY APPROPRIATE TEEN CURRICULUM FOR RISK BEHAVIORS

Dr. Diana E. Clemons Ruth Wetta-Hall, RN, PhD, MPH, MSN Lisette T. Jacobson, MPA, MA Amy Chesser, PhD Ashley Moss, MS

FLON submitted the Pursue Your Dreams program curriculum results manuscript to a scientific peer reviewed journal that included the statistically significant outcomes and it was published in the 2011 American Journal Health Studies (AJHS).

Curricula:  Pursuing MY Dreams – Let Your Journey Begin!, Pursuing MY Dreams – I CAN DO It! and MY Journey:  The Rites of Passage To Responsible Adulthood. Authors:  Dr. Diana E. Clemons, Njeri Shomari, LMSW and LeAnna Benn.

Parent Education Curricula:  Culture Keepers For Future Leaders: A Rites of Passage Guide for Caring Adults – Author:  Njeri Shomari

Preliminary results from the 2009-2010 project period documented that all 26 pre/post survey items analyzed were statistically significant. The results suggest that the curriculum instilled and reinforced commitment toward positive attitudes and behaviors.

As health educators continue to seek solutions for combating risk behaviors such as alcohol and drug use, sexual activity, and violence in youth, novel approaches for engagement in education are needed.

The Future Leaders Outreach Network (FLON) programs were developed, implemented, and evaluated in an urban setting with predominantly African American youth. Curriculum content is tailored toward the cultural needs of African American youth and their parents or primary caregivers.

Preliminary results suggest the curriculum instilled and reinforced commitment toward positive attitudes and behaviors. This article proposes a new model for health education in an urban, public school setting.

FLON submitted the Pursue Your Dreams program results manuscript to a scientific peer reviewed journal. that included the statistically significant outcomes that was published in the 2011 American Journal Health Studies (AJHS).

The box below is the journal abstract. It states that FLON’s PYD EAGLE Club Project curricula proposed a new successful model for health education in an urban, public school setting.

Abstract: As health educators continue to seek solutions for combating risk behaviors such as alcohol and drug use, sexual activity, and violence in youth, novel approaches for engagement in education are needed. The Future Leaders Outreach Network (FLON) programs were developed, implemented, and evaluated in an urban setting with predominantly African American youth. However, the program is effective with all ethnic groups.Curriculum content is tailored toward the cultural needs of African American youth and their parents or primary caregivers. Preliminary results suggest the curriculum instilled and reinforced commitment toward positive attitudes and behaviors. This article proposes a new model for health education in an urban, public school setting.

 

 

Theoretical Framework

FLON uses an integrative, theoretical approach to combat sexual promiscuity and other high-risk behaviors. The Pursuing MY Dreams curricula program operates within Bronfenbrenner’s bio-ecological systems theory (Bronfenbrenner, 1986, 1993).

This theory focuses on a child’s development which is impacted by his/her own maturing biology and the immediate environment including family and school, and social milieu

FLON’s curricula reflects Bronfenbrenner’s four systems where changes in one layer reverberate through other layers.

These systems are referred to as the microsystem, mesosystem, exosystem, and macrosystem.

In the box below is an excerpt from FLON’s article published in the 2011 American Journal Health Studies (AJHS, pages 46-47) that describes each of the four theoretical framework systems

The primary focus for the proposed approach is “Risk Avoidance.” Since 2003, FLON has implemented the Pursuing MY Dreams program activities based on the Bronfenbrenner theoretical framework discussed on the following pages.

 

 

THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK

According to Bronfenbrenner, the microsystem refers to the adolescent’s relationships with his/her immediate environment such as family, school, church, and peer groups.The FLON curriculum influences the adolescent and is underscored through involvement of family and school rather than either one alone. These linkages between two or more settings and how they affect the developing adolescent are reflective of the mesosystem.

The social system – also referred to as exosystem – within which an adolescent resides, indirectly influences his/her decision making pro­cesses to abstain from high-risk behaviors.

In relation to FLON, exosystems that affect the development of an adolescent include community organizations, rallies, faith-based organizations, and other community organizations.  They impact youth indirectly through their influence on, for example, the family or peer group.

Finally, the macrosystem refers to the outermost layer in an adolescent’s development and encompasses cultural values, norms, and laws. If values and norms advocate sexual; risk avoidance/abstinence from high-risk behaviors, then this provides a “blue-print” for the developing adolescent for optimal health.

 

Within this theoretical framework, each “Journey Step” lesson plan (12, forty-five (45) minutes and other positive youth development activities align with the four systems stated above.

The theoretical framework of the PYD Educational Program is based on the 40- Developmental Assets, which are grounded in extensive research in prevention, risk reduction, and resiliency among youth.

To Review 12-page manuscript published in the American Journal Health Studies (AJHS), Click Here Download Journal